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Alphabetical by Author

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    J.W. Eagan

  1. Never judge a book by its movie.

    Amelia Earhart

    (1897-1937) --American aviator, author, first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean
  2. Courage is the price that Life exacts for granting peace.

  3. Adventure is worthwhile in itself.

    Joe Early

    --US Congressman (D-Mass)

  4. They gave me a book of checks. They didn't ask for any deposits. - answering questions about the House Bank Scandal

    Clint Eastwood

    --American actor, director

  5. Go ahead, make my day.

  6. The less secure a man is, the more likely he is to have extreme prejudice.

    Abba Eban

  7. History teaches us that men and nations behave wisely when they have exhausted all other alternatives.

    Thomas Alva Edison

    (1847-1931) --American inventor and industrialist; holder of over 1,000 patents including electric light, generator, music recording, motion pictures, etc.

  8. We don't know a millionth of one percent about anything.

  9. There is no substitute for hard work.

  10. Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.

  11. To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk.

  12. Everything comes to him who hustles while he waits.

  13. Just because something doesn't do what you planned it to do doesn't mean it's useless.

  14. Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.

  15. Great ideas originate in the muscles.

  16. Results! Why man, I have gotten a lot of results. I know several thousand things that won't work.

  17. Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

  18. I am long on ideas, but short on time. I only expect to live only about a hundred years.

  19. There will one day spring from the brain of science a machine or force so fearful in its potentialities, so absolutely terrifying, that even man, the fighter, who will dare torture and death in order to inflict torture and death, will be appalled, and so abandon war forever. What man's mind can create, man's character can control. 1921

    Mary Baker Eddy

    (1821-1910) --Founder of Christian Science

  20. Spirit is the real and eternal; matter is the unreal and temporal.(Science and Health, 1875)

    Murray Edelman

  21. Political history is largely an account of mass violence and of the expenditure of vast resources to cope with mythical fears and hopes. (Politics as Symbolic Action)

    Edward VIII

    (1894-1972) --King of England,Duke of Windsor

  22. The thing that impresses me the most about America is the way parents obey their children.

    Tryon Edwards

  23. Between two evils, choose neither; between two goods, choose both.

  24. Thoughts lead on to purposes; purposes go forth in action; actions form habits; habits decide character; and character fixes our destiny.

    Max Ehrmann

  25. Go placidly amongst the noise and the haste,
    and remember what peace there may be in silence.
    As far as possible, be on good terms with all persons.
    Speak your truth quietly and clearly ;
    and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant ;
    they, too, have their story.
    Avoid loud and aggressive persons ;
    they are vexatious to the spirit.
    If you compare yourself to others, you may become vain or bitter,
    for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
    Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.
    Keep interested in your career, however humble ;
    it is a real possession in the changing fortune of time.
    Exercise caution in your business affairs,
    for the world is full of trickery.
    But let this not blind you to what virtue there is ;
    many persons strive for high ideals
    and everywhere life is full of heroism.
    Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection.
    Neither be cynical about love;
    for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment,
    it is as perennial as the grass.
    Take kindly the council of the years,
    gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
    Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in misfortune.
    Do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
    Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
    Beyond a wholesome discipline be gentle with yourself.
    You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars ;
    you have a right to be here.
    And whether or not it is clear to you,
    no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.
    Therefore, be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be.
    And whatever your labors and aspirations,
    in the noisy confusion of life,
    keep peace in your soul.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
    it is still a beautiful world.
    Be cheerful.
    Strive to be happy.

    Manfred Eigen

    (1927-____) --German Chemist

  26. A theory has only the alternative of being wrong. A model has a third possibility - it might be right but irrelevant.

    Albert Einstein

    (1875-1955) --Physicist, born in Germany, spent later years in the U.S.; won 1921 Nobel Prize for Photoelectric Effect, best known for Theories of Relativity; initiated U.S. nuclear program in WW II.

  27. Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.

  28. As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.

  29. Common sense is that layer of prejudices which we acquire before we are sixteen.

  30. The crippling of individuals I consider the worst evil of capitalism. Our whole educational system suffers from this evil. An exaggerated competitive attitude is inculcated into the student, who is trained to worship acquisitive success as a perparation for his future career. (Monthly Review, 1949)

  31. The difference between what the most and the least learned people know is inexpressibly trivial in relation to that which is unknown.

  32. Do not worry about your problems in mathematics. I assure you, my problems with mathematics are much greater than yours.

  33. The eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility.

  34. Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.

  35. God may be subtle, but He isn't mean.

  36. Gravitation can not be held resposible for people falling in love

  37. Great spirits have often encountered violent opposition from weak minds.

  38. He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.

  39. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depends on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the measure as I have received and am still receiving.

  40. I am absolutely convinced that no wealth in the world can help humanity forward, even in the hands of the most devoted worker. The example of great and pure individuals is the only thing that can lead us to noble thoughts and deeds. Money only appeals to selfishness and irresistably invites abuse. Can anyone imagine Moses, Jesus or Ghandi armed with the money-bags of Carnegie? (On Wealth, 1954)

  41. I am convinced that He [God] does not play dice.

  42. I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.

  43. I don't know how man will fight World War III, but I do know how they will fight World War IV; with sticks and stones.

  44. If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?

  45. Imagination is more important than knowledge.

  46. I never think of the future. It comes soon enough.

  47. The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.

  48. It is not the fruits of scientific research that elevate man and enrich his nature. but the urge to understand, the intellectual work, creative or receptive. -- from Ideas and Opinions (1954)

  49. The man who regards his own life and that of his fellow creatures as meaningless is not merely unhappy but hardly fit for life.

  50. The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.

  51. Of what significance is one's one existence, one is basically unaware. What does a fish know about the water in which he swims all his life? The bitter and the sweet come from outside. The hard from within, from one's own efforts. For the most part I do what my own nature drives me to do. It is embarrassing to earn such respect and love for it.

  52. One should guard against preaching to young people success in the customary form as the main aim in life. The most important motive for work in school and in life is pleasure in work, pleasure in its result, and the knowledge of the value of the result to the community.

  53. The point is to develop the childlike inclination for play and the childlike desire for recognition and to guide the child over to important fields for society. Such a school demands from the teacher that he be a kind of artist in his province.

  54. Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.

  55. Relativity applies to physics, not ethics.

  56. The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.

  57. The significant problems we face cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them.

  58. The world is a dangerous place. Not because of the people who are evil; but because of the people who don't do anything about it.

  59. Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe.

  60. We cannot dispair of humanity, since we are ourselves human beings. (Idea and Opinions,1954)

  61. When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge.

  62. Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science.

  63. You see, wire telegraph is a kind of a very, very long cat. You pull his tail in New York and his head is meowing in Los Angeles. Do you understand this? And radio operates exactly the same way: you send signals here, they receive them there. The only difference is that there is no cat.

    Dwight D. Eisenhower

    (1890-1969) --American Army General, supreme Allied commander WWII, NATO commander, US President from 1953-1961.

  64. I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can, only as one who has seen its brutality, its futility, its stupidity.

  65. Here in America we are descended in blood and in spirit from revolutionists and rebels - men and women who dare to dissent from accepted doctrine. As their heirs, may we never confuse honest dissent with disloyal subversion.

  66. Unless each day can be looked back upon by an individual as one in which he has had some fun, some joy, some real satisfaction, that day is a loss.

  67. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can complel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together. from his farewell address, January 17th, 1961

B A C K


©1994 Stephen L. Spanoudis, All Rights Reserved Worldwide

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